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Author Topic: Selenicereus in comparison with Pereskiopsis  (Read 2820 times)

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Offline robinast

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Selenicereus in comparison with Pereskiopsis
« on: Friday, 20 December 2013 - 16:50:18 »
As I've mentioned in a couple of posts already, I think I'm going to replace Pereskiopsis as a rootstock with Selenicereus. According to my previous experience, the growth rates on both rootstocks are more or less the same: sometimes, the grafts on Pereskiopsis grow a bit faster and sometimes they grow faster on Selenicereus. Most likely, it depends on several factors, including fe species or variety and growing conditions.
The reasons why I'm thinking about using Selenicereus more and more, is that Pereskiopsis as a permanent rootstock is far from being good (Selenicereus performs much better here). It is also often pretty complicated to regraft from the Pereskiopsis stock so that the tissues of the rootstock are not included. And one more thing - while I can easily grow 4 or even 5 Selenicereus stocks in a single 9 cm pot, 3 Pereskiopsis plants are maximum  to plant into pots of that size (due to pretty big leaves the Pereskiopsis stock has).

Nevertheless, sometimes Pereskiopsis gives more eye-pleasing results. Compare the spination of the same cross (Denmoza rhodacantha X Matucana madisoniorum) on those two rootstocks.


Denmoza rhodacantha X Matucana madisoniorum grafted onto the Pereskiopsis ...


... and onto the Selenicereus stock.

Actually, the difference is even more noticeable in reality than it shows up on the photos. Here, the growth rates are a bit different: though the grafts on the Pereskiopsis are 4 weeks younger, they are approximately of the same size as the grafts on Selenicereus. It's interesting to notice that the cross was not viable on it's own roots: by now, all the own-rooted seedlings are gone. Most of them did not look healthy from the very beginning and several grafts also died.

An another cross for comparison - Trichocereus X Oreocereus. Here, the spination looks the same on both rootstocks - but what strongly differs, is the growth habit. While the grafts on the Pereskiopsis stock are more or less globular or even somewhat depressed, the grafts on Selenicereus stock are rather cylindrical. The growth rates are more or less the same - 4 weeks older grafts on Selenicereus are remarkably bigger.


The graft's diameter here is 25 mm (without spines) and height 20 mm.


Here, 35 mm and 18 mm accordingly.
Some pictures from my collection:
http://e-aiand.com/kollektsioon/index.php

Offline danskibsted

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Re: Selenicereus in comparison with Pereskiopsis
« Reply #1 on: Friday, 20 December 2013 - 18:09:50 »
Interesting post, and nice grafts!
How low temperatures can selenicereus take in the winter?
I'm very happy for pereskiopsis, but it is a big problem to store all grafts inside the house in the wintertime.
Dan

Offline robinast

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Re: Selenicereus in comparison with Pereskiopsis
« Reply #2 on: Friday, 20 December 2013 - 18:16:04 »
Actually, I'm not sure what is the minimum suitable temperature for this Selenicereus hybrid. But I can say from my own experience that it tolerates lower temperatures than S. pteranthus fe, a species I also have used earlier. And actually, when I got the first scions of this rootstock, I was told that it had a better cold tolerance than Pereskiopsis... But I do not know is this correct or not.
Some pictures from my collection:
http://e-aiand.com/kollektsioon/index.php

Offline fanecchissimo

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Re: Selenicereus in comparison with Pereskiopsis
« Reply #3 on: Monday, 23 December 2013 - 06:54:07 »
in my experience they are a bit more sensitive to frost and to water deprivation than pereskiopsis. they tend to grow brown/ black spots, while pereskiopsis tend to produce some wood but not to die. selenicereus should be kept a bit moist because if they get too dry they usually don't recover. but it is far easier to graft on selenicereus, and you can change stock when you obtain a good sized scion. it depends on what you want to do with the plant. I wouldn't use it as a permanent rootstock if the greenhouse goes cold in winter

 

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