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Author Topic: Sectorial chimera(maybe).  (Read 2884 times)

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Offline Simon

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Sectorial chimera(maybe).
« on: Friday, 09 December 2011 - 07:50:28 »
This is a continuation from a post under the topic Wierd Astro started by Parchis
These first four pictures are all of Gymnocalicium ragonesii. The first one is of a normal plant in flower. The next three photos all show plants with albino flowers. What I believe is causing this is a type of chimera. In this case the outer layer of cells(L1) have the genes for normal pigmentation. I believe that the inner layers of cells(L2 andL3) have genes that lack the code that produces pigmentation and that the origin of the flower buds must be from the inner layers.
The fourth picture shows a plant that has some lack of pigment in all the layers and hence the orange colour with pink flowers.
In effect these plants contain two different genetic types in different layers, hence the term chimera.





« Last Edit: Friday, 09 December 2011 - 07:54:14 by Simon »

Offline Simon

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Re: Sectorial chimera(maybe).
« Reply #1 on: Friday, 09 December 2011 - 08:07:12 »
This plant is a Matucana hybrid I did. It is showing variegation in sectors that are divided along the line of the areoles, similar to the 1/16 sector on the astrophytum that Parchis showed in his post. I am not sure if the variegation along sectors is due to initials with different genes like the sectorial chimera that Parchis showed us but I think it is interesting that a similar division of sectors is apparent.
It is not known if initial cells in plants are permanent or if they are replaced from time to time. Evidence exists that both possibilities occur. Sometimes variegate sectorial chimeras start and stop producing variegate sectors suggesting the initials are semi-permanent and sometimes are replaced with normal chlorophyll producing cells. This has been shown to be the case with the Cedar in the second picture so for that species it is thought that initials are semi-permanent.




Offline Simon

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Re: Sectorial chimera(maybe).
« Reply #2 on: Friday, 09 December 2011 - 08:22:44 »
Finally these are some pictures of a Haworthia cv. Pale Peace that I propagated from leaf cuttings. This variegate originated as an offset on a plant of cv. BigOne. When I tried to propagate this from leaf cuttings I got 95% all green plants. This suggests to me that the cells that cause the variegate appearance are only in the outer layer(L1) and that the cells inside the leaf are normal green. It further suggests that the meristem cells that initiate bud growth and form the offsets on leaf cuttings are in these inner layers of the leaf.
The first pic shows a plant that is mostly Pale Peace with a green sector and the second shows an all pale peace plant that is producing a new type of pink pigmented growth in a sector. My hope is to produce an all pink offset from this pink sector. The last photo is of a hybrid that is a normal green plant with a sector that has reddish pigment, an unusual type of variegate that I have not seen before.
Hope I haven't talked too much and made you all go to sleep!!!




Offline marazz53

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Re: Sectorial chimera(maybe).
« Reply #3 on: Tuesday, 03 January 2012 - 21:51:23 »
Very nice Haworthias...
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